ENTRIES TAGGED "visualization"

Clinical discovery in the age of “Big Data”

Modern data processing tools, many of them open source, allow more clinical studies at lower costs

This guest posting was written by Yadid Ayzenberg (@YadidAyzenberg on Twitter). Yadid is a PhD student in the Affective Computing Group at the MIT Media Lab. He has designed and implemented cloud platforms for the aggregation, processing and visualization of bio-physiological sensor data. Yadid will speak on this topic at the Strata Rx conference.

A few weeks ago, I learned that the Framingham Heart Study would lose $4 million (a full 40 percent of its funding) from the federal government due to automatic spending cuts. This seminal study, begun in 1948, set out to identify the contributing factors to Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) by following a group of 5,209 men and woman and tracking their life style habits, performing regular physical examinations and lab tests. This study was responsible for finding the major risk factors for CVD, such as high blood pressure and lack of exercise. The costs associated with such large-scale clinical studies are prohibitive, making them accessible only to organizations with sufficient financial resources or through government funding.
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The Next “Top 5%”: Identifying patients for additional care through micro-segmentation

Health data can go beyond the averages and first order patient characteristics to find long-term trends

This article was written with Arijit Sengupta, CEO of BeyondCore. Tim and Arijit will speak at Strata Rx 2013 on the topic of this post.

Current healthcare cost prevention efforts focus on the top 1% of highest risk patients. As care coordination efforts expand to a larger set of the patient population, the critical question is: If you’re a care manager, which patients should you offer additional care to at any given point in time? Our research shows that focusing on patients with the highest risk scores or highest current costs create suboptimal roadmaps. In this article we share an approach to predict patients whose costs are about to skyrocket, using a hypothesis-free micro-segmentation analysis. From there, working with physicians and care managers, we can formulate appropriate interventions.

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One-click analysis: Detecting and visualizing insights automatically

Arijit Sengupta of BeyondCore uncovers hidden relationships in public health data

The importance of visualizing data is universally recognized. But, usually the data is passive input to some visualization tool and the users have to specify the precise graph they want to visualize. BeyondCore simplifies this process by automatically evaluating millions of variable combinations to determine which graphs are the most interesting, and then highlights these to users. In essence, BeyondCore automatically tells us the right questions to ask of our data.

In this video, Arijit Sengupta, CEO of BeyondCore, describes how public health data can be analyzed in real-time to discover anomalies and other intriguing relationships, making them readily accessible even to viewers without a statistical background. Arijit will be speaking at Strata Rx 2013 with Tim Darling of Objective Health, a McKinsey Solution for Healthcare Providers, on the topic of this post.

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Visualization of the Week: Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring”

Stephen Malinowski's latest music visualization celebrates The Rite of Spring's 100th anniversary.

Stephen Malinowski’s hypnotic music visualizations have been quite a hit on YouTube — he has visualized a number of scores, from Debussy’s, Clair de lune to Chopin’s Nocturne in B Major, opus 32 no.1 to his own Fugue in A minor. Anastasia Tsioulcas reports at NPR that Malinowski’s visualizations have garnered more than 100 million page views. And just in time to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring at the end of May, Malinowski created a visualization of the score:

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Visualization of the Week: Hospital procedure charges across the U.S., compared

The New York Times and The Washington Post created visualizations using data released by The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released procedure billing data on more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals. The New York Times and The Washington Post have put together interactive visualizations to help consumers compare costs. The New York Times’ visualization compares costs on a per-hospital basis:

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11 Essential Features that Visual Analysis Tools Should Have

Visual analysis tools are adding advanced analytics for big data

After recently playing with SAS Visual Analytics, I’ve been thinking about tools for visual analysis. By visual analysis I mean the type of analysis most recently popularized by Tableau, QlikView, and Spotfire: you encounter a data set for the first time, conduct exploratory data analysis, with the goal of discovering interesting patterns and associations. Having used a few visualization tools myself, here’s a quick wish-list of features (culled from tools I’ve used or have seen in action).

Requires little (to no) coding
The viz tools I currently use require programming skills. Coding means switching back-and-forth between a visual (chart) and text (code). It’s nice1 to be able to customize charts via code, but when you’re in the exploratory phase not having to think about code syntax is ideal. Plus GUI-based tools allow you to collaborate with many more users.

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Visualization of the Week: Building collapse rescue efforts

The BBC pulled data from the International Rescue Corps to create an interactive guide to emergency response efforts in a building collapse.

In the wake of recent building collapses, the BBC addressed the question of what goes into the rescue efforts by creating an interactive guide outlining how rescuers approach a collapsed building.

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Visualization of the Week: A DDoS attack on VideoLAN downloads infrastructure

Using Logstalgia, developer Ludovic Fauvet created a video visualization of a recent DDoS attack on VideoLAN.

In the wake of a recent DDoS attack on open source software distributor VideoLAN, developer Ludovic Fauvet created a video visualization to show what the attack looked like.

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Visualization of the Week: Every recorded U.S terror attack 1970-2011

Using START Global Terrorism data, Simon Rogers mapped every U.S. terror attack recorded between 1970 and 2011.

The recent terror attack at the Boston Marathon prompted the Guardian’s Simon Rogers (who will soon be Twitter’s Simon Rogers) to look into the history of attacks on U.S. soil. Using data from the START Global Terrorism Database, Rogers mapped every recorded terrorist incident in the U.S. from 1970 to 2011.

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Visualization of the Week: A day in the life of a bus line

Urban Data Challenge winners Adam Greenhall, Amelia Greenhall, and Jared McFarland visualized bus route activity for Zurich, San Francisco, and Geneva.

The Urban Data Challenge winners have been announced. The grand prize was awarded to the team behind the Dots on the Bus animated, interactive visualization — Adam Greenhall, Amelia Greenhall, and Jared McFarland.

The team culled public transportation data provided for the contest by Zurich, San Francisco, and Geneva from the week of October 1-7, 2012. According to the about pop-up on the visualization site, the data included “each bus, the time it arrived at each stop, and how many people got on and off (as counted by lasers), along with the lat/long of each stop and route.”

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