ENTRIES TAGGED "nosql"

Analytic engines that factor in security labels

Data stores are rolling out easy-to-use analysis tools

Originated by the NSA, Apache Accumulo is a BigTable inspired data store known for being highly scalable and for its interesting security model. Federal agencies and Defense contractors have deployed Accumulo on clusters of a thousand or more servers. It also uses “cell-level” security to control access to values stored in individual cells1.

What Accumulo was lacking were easy-to-use, standard analytic engines that allow users to interact with data. The release of Sqrrl Enterprise this past week fills that gap. Sqrrl Enterprise provides an initial set of analytic engines for the Accumulo ecosystem2. It includes support for interactive SQL, fulltext search, and queries over graph data. Each of these engines takes into account security labels placed on data: since every data object ingested into Sqrrl has a security label, (query & analytic) results incorporate those access levels. Analysts interact with data as they normally would. For example Sqrrl’s indexing technology accounts for security labels, and search queries are written in standard Lucene syntax. Reminiscent of the Phoenix project for HBase3, SQL queries4 in Sqrrl are converted into optimized Accumulo iterators.

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The Future Is Graph Databases

A Conversation with the Founder of Neo4J, Emil Eifrem

Emil Eifrem @emileifrem is the Founder of Neo4j and CEO of Neo Technology. He is also one of the authors of Graph Databases. Recently, I had the opportunity to sit down with Emil and we talked about the current and future opportunities for graph databases.

Key highlights include:

  • Emil explains graph databases [Discussed at 0:29]
  • Facebook Graph Search is a well-known example of a graph database [Discussed at 3:28]
  • But really, graph databases can be used more much more than social search [Discussed at 4:50]
  • Neo4j, the original graph database [Discussed at 5:25]
  • Graph databases ‘shape’ data [Discussed at 6:20]

You can view the full interview here:

This post was originally published on O’Reilly’s Programming blog.

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Returning transactions to distributed data stores

Principles for the next generation of NoSQL databases

By David Rosenthal and Stephen Pimentel

Rise of NoSQL

Database technologies are undergoing rapid evolution, with new approaches being actively explored after decades of relative stability. As late as 2008, the term “NoSQL”  barely existed and relational databases were both commercially dominant and entrenched in the developer community. Since then NoSQL systems have rapidly gained prominence and early systems such as Google’s Bigtable and Amazon’s Dynamo have inspired dozens of new databases (HBase, Cassandra, Voldemort, MongoDB, etc.) that fall under the NoSQL umbrella.

The first generation of NoSQL databases aimed to achieve the dual goals of fault tolerance and horizontal scalability on clusters of commodity hardware There are now a variety of NoSQL systems available that, at their best, achieve these goals. Unfortunately, the cost for these benefits is high: limited data model flexibility and extensibility, and weak guarantees for applications due to the lack of multi-statement (global) transactions.

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Data’s next steps

RedMonk's Steve O'Grady weighs in on data's pressing issues.

Redmonk analyst Steve O'Grady discusses the demand for data scientists, the problem of using data to asking the right questions, and why you shouldn't rush into a NoSQL investment.

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The NoSQL movement

The NoSQL movement

How to think about choosing a database.

A relational database is no longer the default choice. Mike Loukides charts the rise of the NoSQL movement and explains how to choose the right database for your application.

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Oracle’s NoSQL

Oracle's NoSQL Database is more than a product. It's also an acknowledgement.

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

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Strata Week: Oracle’s big data play

Strata Week: Oracle’s big data play

Oracle unveils its big data appliance, the Hadoop community gauges contributions.

In this week's data news, Oracle unveils its big data strategy, and Cloudera looks at the contributions to the Hadoop core and community.

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Oracle’s Big Data Appliance: what it means

Hadoop and R are the new industry standards

Today, Oracle announced their Big Data Appliance. It couldn't be a plainer validation of what's important in big data right now, or where the battle for technology dominance lies.

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Who are the OSCON data geeks?

Who are the OSCON data geeks?

OSCON's co-chairs dig into the OSCON Data program.

OSCON's co-chairs discuss sessions in the OSCON Data conference and the people who might be interested in the associated topics.

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Improving healthcare in Zambia with CouchDB

Improving healthcare in Zambia with CouchDB

CouchDB proves a good fit for a project with technical limits.

A new project in Zambia is trying to integrate supervisors, clinics, and community healthcare workers into a system that can improve patient service and provide more data. In this interview, Cory Zue explains how CouchDB is playing a role.

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