ENTRIES TAGGED "interactive visualization"

Visualization of the Week: Commuting Paris

Dataveyes' new interactive map visualizes the Paris metro system from a time and crowd perspective.

The team at Dataveyes has launched its latest project, Metropolitain.io, an interactive map visualizing the Paris metro system. Using data provided by Autonomous Operator of Parisian Transports (RATP) and from Isokron, the team visualized the metro system from both a crowd and time perspective.

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Visualization of the Week: A day in the life of a bus line

Urban Data Challenge winners Adam Greenhall, Amelia Greenhall, and Jared McFarland visualized bus route activity for Zurich, San Francisco, and Geneva.

The Urban Data Challenge winners have been announced. The grand prize was awarded to the team behind the Dots on the Bus animated, interactive visualization — Adam Greenhall, Amelia Greenhall, and Jared McFarland.

The team culled public transportation data provided for the contest by Zurich, San Francisco, and Geneva from the week of October 1-7, 2012. According to the about pop-up on the visualization site, the data included “each bus, the time it arrived at each stop, and how many people got on and off (as counted by lasers), along with the lat/long of each stop and route.”

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Visualization of the Week: MOOC completion rates

Educational researcher Katy Jordan created an interactive visualization using completion and enrollment data from recent MOOCs.

Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, offered through platforms such as Coursera, EdX and Udacity, are arguably helping to fill higher education needs around the world. Educational researcher Katy Jordan noted in a post, however, that “although thousands enroll for courses, a very small proportion actually complete the course.” To take a closer look, she pulled together an interactive visualization to show enrollment numbers and completion rates from recent MOOCs.

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Visualization of the Week: Tweet connections between Twitter employees

While developing his new networks visualization platform Newk, Santiago Ortiz took it for a test drive on Twitter's corporate structure.

Designer Santiago Ortiz is developing a browser-based networks visualization platform called Newk. He took the platform for a spin and visualized the network of Twitter conversations between Twitter employees for the week of February 15 to February 22.

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Visualization of the Week: NFL rushing stats

Every NFL rushing play from 2008-2011, visualized.

Juice Labs has cooked up an interactive visualization, “The Spider,” showing rushing tendencies of every NFL team from the 2008 through 2011 seasons. Want to know which way the New England Patriots typically run — and the average or total yards gained — on first and long, or Stevan Ridley’s average yards gained on 4th and short during the 2011 season (-1 … ouch …)? The visualization shows this and more for every team, player, and rush.

Click here for the full visualization.

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Visualization of the Week: Forecasting the US presidential election

The New York Times visualizes data from polling aggregation website FiveThirtyEight to forecast the winner of the US presidential election.

The US presidential election is just weeks away, and there is no shortage of polls and collected indicators — in the US and around the world — being used to predict the outcome. Polling aggregation website FiveThirtyEight has made a science of forecasting the US presidential election results, and the New York Times has visualized its election 2012 forecast data, including historical context, to show how state allegiances to the Democratic and Republican parties have shifted.

The interactive visualization shows each candidate’s forecasted position based on either the size of the lead or the number of predicted electoral votes, along with the historical shifts through past elections. Data points running down the left side can be highlighted in the visualization as well. In the screenshot below, the visualization shows the forecasted electoral votes, with the added highlight of the historical and predicted allegiance of Ohio, the state that has voted for the winner in every election since 1964.

New York Times US presidential election visualization
Click to view the full visualization.

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Visualization of the Week: Visualizing marginalization

A look at the World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) interactive visualization tool.

The Education for All Global Monitoring Report team launched a new visualization tool this week, the World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE).

This is far more than a typical visualization that presents information in an interesting way. WIDE is an interactive website that lets users mine and explore the data themselves.

The about page on the WIDE website explains that the tool pulls together education data from more than 60 countries. Users can compare education levels and availability between countries and groups, and results can narrow down to parameters such as gender, ethnicity, location and wealth. The data is freely available and can be downloaded in an Excel spreadsheet. Charts, tables or maps created by users can also be shared.

The following screenshot shows an example of the data explored through specific indicators — in this case, populations living in extreme education poverty:

See the full version of this visualization.

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