Roger Magoulas

Roger Magoulas is the director of market research at O'Reilly Media. Magoulas runs a team that is building an open source analysis infrastucture and provides analysis services, including technology trend analysis, to business decision-makers at O'Reilly and beyond. In previous incarnations, Magoulas designed and implemented data warehouse projects for organizations ranging from the San Francisco Opera to the Alberta Motor Club.

Four data themes to watch from Strata + Hadoop World 2012

In-memory data storage, SQL, data preparation and asking the right questions all emerged as key trends at Strata + Hadoop World.

At our successful Strata + Hadoop World conference (including successfully avoiding Sandy), a few themes emerged that resonated with my interests and experience as a hands-on data analyst and as a researcher who tracks technology adoption trends. Keep in mind that these themes reflect my personal biases. Others will have a different take on their own key takeaways from the conference.

1. In-memory data storage for faster queries and visualization

Interactive or real-time query for large datasets is seen as a key to analyst productivity (real-time as in query times fast enough to keep the user in the flow of analysis, from sub-second to less than a few minutes). The existing large-scale data management schemes aren’t fast enough and reduce analytical effectiveness when users can’t explore the data by quickly iterating through various query schemes. We see companies with large data stores building out their own in-memory tools, e.g., Dremel at Google, Druid at Metamarkets, and Sting at Netflix, and new tools, like Cloudera’s Impala announcement at the conference, UC Berkeley’s AMPLab’s Spark, SAP Hana, and Platfora.

We saw this coming a few years ago when analysts we pay attention to started building their own in-memory data store sandboxes, often in key/value data management tools like Redis, when trying to make sense of new, large-scale data stores. I know from my own work that there’s no better way to explore a new or unstructured data set than to be able to quickly run off a series of iterative queries, each informed by the last. Read more…

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Need faster machine learning? Take a set-oriented approach

How a days-long data process was completed in minutes.

We recently faced the type of big data challenge we expect to become increasingly common: scaling up the performance of a machine learning classifier for a large set of unstructured data. In this post, we explain how a set-oriented approach led to huge performance gains.

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